ANZRP recognised as a “Best For The World” B Corp

 

ANZRP has been named a Best For The World honouree by B Lab in recognition of its significant positive impact in its innovative governance structures to protect the mission of our business. Ranking in the top 10% of all B Corps for our governance impact, ANZRP earned this honour because of our overall mission, ethics, accountability, and transparency.

Best For The World recognition is administered by B Lab, the global nonprofit that certifies and supports Certified B Corporations, which are companies dedicated to using business as a force for good. Today there are 3,000 Certified B Corporations across 64 countries and 150 industries, unified by one common goal: to redefine success in business.

B Corps meet the highest standards of verified social and environmental performance, public transparency, and accountability to balance profit and purpose. B Corp Certification doesn’t just evaluate a product or service, it assesses the overall positive impact of the company that stands behind it.

“We’re incredibly proud of this year’s Best For The World honourees,” says Anthea Kelsick, Chief Marketing Officer of B Lab. “These inspiring companies represent the kinds of business models and impact-driven business strategies that are building a new economy—one that is inclusive, regenerative, and delivers value to all stakeholders, not just shareholders.”

ANZRP was measured on whether it has adopted a social or environmental mission, and how it engages its employees, board members and the community to achieve this mission. This section of the B Impact Assessment also measures employees’ access to financial information, customers’ opportunities to provide feedback, and the diversity of the company’s governing bodies.

ANZRP made this list thanks to our mission being inherently in the interest of the environment – engaged in product stewardship and promoting recycling. Social and environmental performance is also built into formal board decision-making processes and board and staff KPIs, and our formal governance processes are transparently managed by the board and its three sub-committees.

1,000 B Corps from 44 countries were named to the 2019 Best For The World lists, including Patagonia, Beautycounter, Dr. Bronner’s, TOMS, Seventh Generation, and Greyston Bakery. The 2019 Best For The World honourees are determined based on the verified B Impact Assessments of Certified B Corporations. The full lists are available on https://bcorporation.net/.  ANZRP’s B Impact Report can be seen at https://bcorporation.net/directory/australia-and-new-zealand-recycling-platform.

 


ANZRP receives certification just in time for B Corp Month

ANZRP is excited to announce it recently attained B Corporation certification.

It is the first e-waste recycling organisation in Australia to be accredited as a B Corp certified service provider.

Certified B Corporations meet higher standards of social and environmental performance, transparency, and accountability, balancing profit and purpose.

CEO Warren Overton said that perseverance through the rigorous certification process will set the company apart from other players in the industry.

“Our team worked tirelessly over months to complete the assessment and provide the evidence required to achieve certification, and we are thrilled to have that effort rewarded,” Warren said.

“The process however really began seven years ago upon inception of the business, as ANZRP’s mission and governance procedures built from the beginning paved the way for the impact we have been able to achieve.”

B Corps are leaders of the global movement of people using business as a force for good. There are over 2,700 Certified B Corporations from more than 150 industries in 60+ countries with one unifying goal – to redefine success in business.

The certification comes just in time for B Corp Month, an awareness campaign promoting B Corporations and what it means to be part of the community.

ANZRP joins an impressive community of global for-purpose brands including Patagonia, Ben & Jerry’s, Australian Ethical, Intrepid Group and Klean Kanteen.

The performance standards B Corps meet are comprehensive, transparent and verified. Unlike traditional corporations, Certified B Corporations consider the impact of their decisions not only on their shareholders, but also on their stakeholders (e.g., workers, suppliers, community, consumers, and the environment).

As a not-for-profit organisation operating to the highest health, safety and environmental standards, ANZRP’s vision is to ensure maximum amounts of precious resources are captured and used in the manufacture of new products, and materials are handled in a way that does not cause harm to the people managing them.

Warren says this certification also means recognition among new markets.

“As a multi-industry benchmark of performance known and understood beyond the e-waste industry, attaining B Corp certification will open doors for ANZRP.”

Key activities which contributed to certification include:

Governance

Mission – We are a not-for-profit company and the objects of our constitution focus on being a Co-reg under the Product Stewardship Act, performing product stewardship and promoting recycling. If the company winds up, any surplus funds are to be transferred to a similar organisation who applies profits to similar objects.

Decision-making – Social and environmental performance is integrated in Board decision-making processes and Board and staff KPIs.

Ethics and transparency – We employ formal governance processes managed by the Board and the Board’s three sub-committees (Audit, Risk and Governance sub-committee, Sustainable Business Growth sub-committee and Nomination and Remuneration sub-committee).

Community

Diversity, equity and inclusion – We celebrate a diverse team of staff in terms of gender, age and ethnicity, and strong female representation at the Board level.

Local suppliers – High proportion of suppliers are local with a significant amount employing workers who are disadvantaged (low income communities, long-term unemployed, disability sector).

Advocacy – Strong advocacy program at the Federal and State level to improve and implement product stewardship and recycling programs and improve industry standards.

Supply chain – Rigorous supplier evaluation, selection and due diligence program.

Environment

Product stewardship – Collection, transport and recycling of e-waste across Australia through our TechCollect program.

Resource conservation – Independent life cycle assessment of our supply chain demonstrates significant avoided greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water usage and particulate matter emission as a result of our TechCollect program.

 

As the B Corp program focusses on continuous improvement, the recertification process plus the guidelines, templates and tools provided by B Corp will help ANZRP to continue to improve its performance and impact.

Check out ANZRP’s Impact Score card here: bcorporation.net/directory/australia-and-new-zealand-recycling-platform

To find out more about B Corporations and B Lab, go to bcorporation.net.

 


ANZRP to build world’s first commercial e-waste plastic micro-factory

ANZRP is excited to announce its plans to build the world’s first commercial e-waste plastic micro-factory after receiving a $250,000 grant from Sustainability Victoria.

In partnership with UNSW SMaRT Centre and e-recycler TES, the micro-factory will process up to 500,000 kilograms of waste plastic per year. This will be recovered from e-waste recycling and reformed into 3D printer filament for retail sale. Worldwide demand for plastic 3D printer filament is estimated to triple during the next four years, reaching a value of more than USD$1,965.30 million by 2023[1].

With the upcoming e-waste ban in Victoria and growing restrictions on exports of mixed e-waste plastic, options to reduce the cost of recycling and keep these materials out of landfill are important. This project aims to reform a waste stream (e-waste plastic) that’s currently shipped overseas for processing.

“The e-waste plastic micro-factory is a truly circular economy approach that ensures materials are kept in productive use,” says ANZRP CEO, Warren Overton.

“We’re so pleased to be supporting Australian innovation from UNSW and TES that helps improve e-waste recycling.

“As the volume of e-waste continues to increase, technologically advanced approaches such as micro-factories will play a key role mitigating the impact of old televisions and computers.

“By working alongside industry and internationally recognised research hubs, ANZRP is committed to ensuring all e-waste is managed responsibly. This reduces environmental impact and creates employment.”

Victorian Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate, Lily D’Ambrosio says, These grants will help develop a circular economy that maximises the reuse of materials and reduces the amount of waste that goes to landfill. These exciting projects across Victoria will stop waste, boost the resource recovery industry and create jobs.”

With construction due to start early next year, the micro-factory will be housed at the TES e-waste recycling facility in Somerton, Victoria. This portable factory has the potential to be moved and process recovered e-waste plastic in other areas.

“The micro-factory has the potential to scale and accommodate the 6,000-tonne plastic feedstock that is currently produced each year from the e-waste recycled through the TechCollect program. We have taken the first step with a scalable solution that has guaranteed feedstock, strong environmental benefits, as well as economic benefits through the creation of employment opportunities in regional and metropolitan parts of Australia,” concludes Warren Overton.

[1] 3D Printing Plastics Market by Type (Photo polymer, ABS, Poly amide, PLA), Form (Filament, Liquid/Ink, Powder), End-Use Industry (Healthcare, Aerospace & Defense, Automotive, Electrical & Electronics), Application, and Region - Global Forecast to 2023, MarketsandMarkets


A recipe for a successful national e-waste recycling program

As New Zealand considers the benefits of product stewardship and its impact on e-waste recycling, ANZRP CEO Warren Overton sets out the critical elements for a successful national e-waste recycling program based on the Australian experience.

 

Last month we launched our TechCollect pilot e-waste recycling program just across the ditch in New Zealand.

Operating through the OfficeMax retail network, TechCollect provides 16 drop-off points across New Zealand where people can take their unwanted e-waste for recycling completely free of charge.

Already we've had an astounding level of interest, with hundreds of visits to our new website and enquiries rolling in by the dozen. This is indicative of the New Zealand public's appetite for responsible and accessible e-waste recycling, a void that has to this point not been filled. Unlike its Australian and overseas counterparts, the country has struggled to better manage the increasing volume of e-waste generated annually - a recent report from the International Telecommunications Union shows kiwis are among the world's worst offenders, producing an estimated 20kg per person per year.

 

Product stewardship is key

Australia's approach to managing the growing issue of e-waste is founded on the notion of product stewardship. This concept acknowledges that those involved in producing, selling and using products have a shared responsibility to ensure that those products or materials are managed in a way that reduces their impact, throughout their life cycle, on the environment and on human health and safety.

A key pillar of Australia's National Waste Policy is the Product Stewardship Act 2011. Established under the Act, the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS) was Australia’s first producer responsibility arrangement. Under the scheme, more than 1,800 collection services have been made available to the public and 230,000 tonnes of TV and computer e-waste collected and recycled. 130,000 tonnes of that has been managed by ANZRP's flagship program TechCollect.

In recent years, the New Zealand Government has twice investigated e-waste product stewardship and on both occasions was unable to establish a long term industry funded program.

Technology industry ready to participate

Despite New Zealand's lack of regulatory enforcement, major players in the electronics industry have just committed to funding our TechCollect pilot e-waste recycling program. Microsoft, Toshiba, HP, Epson, Dell and Canon have all pledged funds to the pilot, which has been a major driver in getting the program off the ground.

The quick commitment from these world-leading organisations shows their eagerness to uphold their corporate social responsibility status, and position themselves as leaders on this issue. They understand the importance of environmental and social sustainability to their brand and are ready with their cheque book to support initiatives that shine a light on their commitment.

Key elements of a successful e-waste recycling program

Fundamental to a thriving e-waste recycling program is a model where industry covers costs of collection and recycling. The ideal approach is through a liability-based fee in a competitive environment that encourages cost competition.

Other critical factors include:

Government funding — Sufficient government funding for e-waste product stewardship is required to ensure effective program management, audit and enforcement of requirements, and promotion of the program to the whole community. Underfunding allows liable parties to avoid compliance and diminishes community engagement with the program.

Competition — Competition is good for logistics and recycling yet is counterproductive for collection as it can create duplication and inefficiencies. Due to the small size of the New Zealand market, the number of organisations engaged to deliver an e-waste product stewardship program should be limited to reduce administrative costs.

Scope — To gain the benefits of scale, for both logistics and processing, as wide a scope as possible is recommended for an e-waste product stewardship program. Under Australia’s NTCRS, only televisions, computers, printers and computer peripherals are accepted. Even though this created a pool of easily identifiable parties, making it easier to manage, inclusion of all waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) would increase the amount of liable parties and exponentially increase the volume targets, guaranteeing greater economies of scale.

Collection network — Vital to its success, a collection network must include a broad spectrum of partners, including local councils, retail providers (such as electrical goods retailers) and private recycling owner-operated sites and community facilities. Aside from maintaining the reach of the service, they also serve an important role helping educate the public through their regular interactions.

Education — It’s important for people to understand the process of recycling e-waste and where they can responsibly dispose of it, knowing that it will be managed to the highest standards in accordance with the regulatory and legislative requirements. To achieve this, a simple and consistent approach is necessary — only government can fill this requirement. After seven years, the Australian public still does not have a strong understanding of e-waste and what can be done. Government needs to take the lead and project clear and consistent messaging.

Recycling partners – Competition is good and should not be limited to a few. Strict standards need to be enforced, ensuring downstream vendor due diligence and material traceability is achieved. All recyclers who serve the program are required to meet certain standards such as compliance to AS/NZS 5377:2013 and HSE legislation, and are regularly audited to ensure reporting volumes are correct.

 

Now entering its seventh year and despite some issues that need to be ironed out, Australia's NTCRS has been acknowledged as a resounding success. Product stewardship underpinned by accessibility, collaboration, transparency and trust — these are the critical elements that form a successful e-waste recycling program.

ANZRP would welcome the New Zealand Government’s participation into our pilot program, and the prospect of matching program funding to help lengthen and facilitate its ongoing success.

To find out more about our TechCollect pilot in New Zealand go to www.techcollect.nz.


Man lifting old computer from skip bin for recycling

ANZRP meets all FY 16/17 Regulatory targets

ANZRP’s FY 16/17 Annual Report is now published on both the Federal Government and our websites. You can view it here.

We are proud to announce that we have met both Regulatory targets of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS) – Recycling and Reasonable Access - and continue to maintain quality standards in a high cost-pressure environment. We also recovered over 95% of the commodities in the e-waste we collected, which is above the Scheme’s Material Recovery Target of 90%.

ANZRP is committed to making an active contribution to the enhancement and progression of product stewardship in Australia; and supporting our Members, not only with their obligations under the NTCRS, but representing them in broader product stewardship and thought leadership activities.

Education is key to driving change, which is why we invest significantly in broad-scale marketing to create community awareness and understanding of the importance of e-waste recycling and to re-evaluate the "take, make and dispose” extractive industrial model.

If you have any questions about the Annual Report, please don’t hesitate to contact us.


Out of focus image of office cubicles with a recycling bin in focus in the foreground

5 ways recycling e-waste can benefit your business

An essential part of running a business is to keep up to date with technology, which requires periodically updating your electronic devices. However, the old devices that have been replaced pose a problem for many small businesses — what do you do with the old tech when you replace it?

While throwing old cables and computers out with your general office waste may seem like the easy answer, the better business decision is to responsibly recycle your old or unused electronics.

Recent research commissioned by TechCollect revealed that 83% of Australians weren’t sure where they could recycle e-waste. And 58% said they didn’t want to pay to have devices properly recycled. You’re not alone when it comes to the issue of e-waste in your office; many businesses just aren’t aware of the real benefits of recycling e-waste, or how to start. It’s much easier than you think — here’s what you need to know:

1. Make a positive difference to the environment

The most obvious, yet greatest benefit of recycling e-waste is the positive impact it has on our environment. Many electronic devices contain heavy metals like lead and mercury, which can be extremely harmful to both land and water. Recycling these devices ensures materials don’t end up in landfill, and are instead correctly and safely recovered and recycled.

Electronic devices also contain non-renewable resources, which, if recycled correctly, can be recovered and re-used in the manufacturing of new products. Keeping resources in use is the best outcome and leads to a circular economy.

Recycling is often viewed as a civic duty; however, it is just as important for businesses to consider their environmental impact as part of their daily practice. This is not only beneficial to the environment, but is often expected by consumers, clients and employees.

2. Happy employees

Did you know more than three-quarters of Australian employees want business owners to take more action when it comes to recycling workplace technology?1

With environmental concerns increasing among Australians, employees are beginning to expect recycling e-waste to be common practice in the workplace. In fact, an increasing number of prospective employees are looking to work for businesses that operate under ethical policies and actively make business decisions in which positive environmental outcomes are a priority.

Beyond recruitment, sustainable workplace policies help retain current employees — keeping them happier, productive and more engaged.

3. Improve your brand reputation

Showing your commitment to the environment can strengthen your reputation with current and prospective customers. Recent research shows businesses and brands with a demonstrated commitment to sustainability outperform those who don’t2.

It’s becoming increasingly common to select your business partners based on their ethical standing as organisations. Businesses which actively strive to have a positive impact on the environment make more desirable business partners and a compelling choice for customers. Implementing e-waste recycling is a simple way to enhance your business’s green credentials.

4. Declutter the office

Old and unused electronic devices are often sitting at the back of cupboards gathering dust, or you may even have shelves or the corner of an office dedicated to old technology storage. Not only will recycling your old e-waste benefit the environment — by reducing landfill and the need to mine new resources — but you’ll also have a clean, decluttered office, which ultimately improves efficiency and harmony in the office!

5. Lower business costs

Recycling also has a significant and tangible impact on your bottom line. Did you know that recycling is less expensive than waste removal fees, which are measured by weight?

It is important to choose both a cost-effective and reputable recycling program for your business. Some organisations, including TechCollect, which is dedicated to setting the highest standard of Australian recycling, will collect and recycle your business’s e-waste for free.

What about your data?

Our recent research revealed 52% of Australians are not recycling their IT e-waste due to concerns about security of data.

In fact, personal data was highlighted as a key concern twice, with 64% of respondents also stating they don’t recycle their e-waste because they worry their data will get into the wrong hands. This number has increased by 25% in just two years.

In this technological age, it’s understandable to be concerned about data security and privacy. However, it is relatively simple to permanently remove your data from your company’s electronic devices before they are safely recycled. All you need to do is search online for data wiping services or software, or check with the product manufacturer on how to delete your data. There are also secure commercial services that specialise in data deletion. Be proactive in your data management and don’t let it be a barrier to doing the right thing by the environment!

How do I start?

Below is a simple, step-by-step process to recycle IT e-waste in your office:

  1. Get the whole team involved.
  2. Gather all your unwanted and unused IT e-waste from around the workplace.
  3. Remove your data: search online for data deletion services or software or check with the manufacturer of your product to discover how to delete your data.
  4. If you have a significant amount of e-waste, call TechCollect on 1300 229 837 to see if your small business qualifies for a free pick-up. TechCollect will take IT and TVs; check out http://techcollect.com.au/what-we-take.
  5. Or, find your nearest free drop-off point at http://techcollect.com.au/our-locations/. If you can’t find a TechCollect service near you, check out http://recyclingnearyou.com.au.
  6. Drop off your e-waste, and enjoy your new decluttered office and shining business reputation!

References

1Planet Ark, 2016. National Recycling Week. So You Think You Can Recycle Report, http://recyclingweek.planetark.org/documents/doc-1451-nrw-2016-report-so-you-think-you-can-recycle.pdf

2http://businessrecycling.com.au/research/business-case-competetive-edge.cfm

By Warren Overton, CEO, Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform

Originally published on Tuesday, 27 February, 2018 by Sustainability Matters


Out of focus black and white image of a team collaborating in a meeting room

ANZRP welcomes new CEO

ANZRP is pleased to announce the appointment on 5 February of Warren Overton as its new Chief Executive Officer (CEO), replacing outgoing CEO Carmel Dollisson.

Warren is a highly regarded advocate and spokesperson with more than 20 years’ experience in sustainability, including executive roles in business, industry associations and government. Most recently, he served as Director, Business and Built Environment at Sustainability Victoria. Before then he was Co-Founder and Managing Director of Viridis, a national sustainability consulting business operating in four states.

“The Board is very pleased to have Warren joining ANZRP. His exceptional track record in sustainability places us in a very good position to build on the strong foundations that Carmel and her team have built since ANZRP’s inception”, said ANZRP Chairman Mark Mackay.

Carmel Dollisson announced her intention to step down from the CEO role late 2017, in order to take a well-earned break before undertaking some new challenges.

Under Carmel’s leadership, ANZRP has grown from its modest beginnings in 2011 to become the largest Co-regulatory Arrangement under the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme, established by the Federal Government under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 as an industry-funded scheme for the safe and responsible recycling of e-waste.

The ANZRP Board, which comprises representatives from member companies Canon, Fuji-Xerox, Dell, HP and Toshiba, together with three independent Directors, undertook a thorough executive search before appointing Warren Overton.

The Board sees one of Warren’s main priorities as leading ANZRP through the final stages and aftermath of the current Regulatory Review of the Product Stewardship Act, and to drive further expansion of the company’s mission to be a leading product stewardship partner, recognised both locally and globally.

“I’m delighted to be joining ANZRP at this vital time in the company’s evolution. Carmel’s exceptional work has put us in a great position to expand our operations to achieve the dual outcomes of lower costs to our member companies and better recycling outcomes for the Australian public,” said Warren Overton.

“In terms of our core program, it’s very much business as usual, as TechCollect now operates as a well-oiled machine. But there’s a great deal more we’re planning to do through our product stewardship expertise and credentials.”

Carmel Dollisson is delighted to be leaving ANZRP in good hands.

“This business has been my passion for more than six years, and it’s not going to be easy to leave it behind. I’m reassured by the work the Board has undertaken in securing a new CEO, and I look forward to working closely with Warren during the transition period.”

Carmel will remain with ANZRP until late March to ensure a smooth handover with Warren.

“Thanks to Carmel we have the benefit of the most orderly of transitions and are well-placed to continue growing our business. Our members and the general public who rely on our free service can be assured ANZRP will continue to provide its industry-leading recycling program,” said Mark Mackay.

“The ANZRP Board warmly welcomes Warren Overton to the team and we would like to thank Carmel for her tireless dedication to establishing a business with world-class credentials.”


Old computer screens for recycling

ANZRP launches White Paper at Parliament House

August 2017 marked the launch of ANZRP’s White Paper, which includes many recommended changes to the Product Stewardship Act for consideration during its five-year Regulatory review. On behalf of the Minister for the Environment and Energy, Tim Wilson MP, Federal Member for Goldstein, joined ANZRP’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Carmel Dollisson to officially launch the White Paper, which outlines how ANZRP believes the current legislation can be improved to create better recycling practices in Australia.

L-R Mark Mackay, ANZRP Chairman, Independent Director, Tim Wilson, MP, Federal Member for Goldstein and Carmel Dollisson, ANZRP CEO

You can view and download a copy of the White Paper here.

Carmel Dollisson, CEO, ANZRP, explains that ANZRP’s mission has always been to create a community that collects, processes and safely recycles e-waste (electronic waste) for responsible environment outcomes.

“With the changing e-waste landscape, we strongly believe the Review of the Act is key to improving product stewardship in Australia. It is vital for increasing transparency, innovation and economic opportunity in the recycling industry.

“With July marking the sixth anniversary of the Act, we are pleased to have the opportunity to provide an informed industry perspective on how the Scheme is working and ways in which it can be enhanced, updated and improved.

“We have captured the insights of our member companies and our own experience in the White Paper to ensure changes made to the Act deliver the best outcomes for business, local communities and the environment.”

The White Paper details numerous recommendations for the Government Regulator to consider, including:

  • Expanding the products collected
  • A greater level of shared responsibility by all stakeholders in the product lifecycle
  • Greater transparency within the Scheme itself
  • Redefining the volume of available e-waste
  • Educating the public on the benefits of product stewardship
Carmel Dollission, ANZRP CEO

“The core principle of good product stewardship is that everyone involved in producing, selling, using and disposing of products has a shared responsibility to ensure those products are responsibly recycled.

“That principle has been behind our development of the White Paper. We’re very hopeful that the Review will facilitate greater collaboration and ensure confidence in the e-waste recycling industry.”

To read the White Paper in full, click here.


ANZRP annual report 2015 2016

ANZRP 2015/16 Annual Report released

ANZRP’s 2015/16 Annual Report has now been released and is available to view here.

If you have any questions about the Report, please contact us on 1300 229 837.


Computer stacked together for recycling

ANZRP and Industry Updates

There have recently been two important updates relating both to ANZRP and the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS), under which TechCollect is operated.

First, the WEEE Forum has welcomed ANZRP as its first non-European member: https://goo.gl/WLnBL6

Second, the NTCRS has announced its regulatory review of the Scheme: https://goo.gl/JU0jSm

We will release further information on the regulatory review as it comes to hand.